An examination of the brain trauma in Novice and Midget ice hockey: Implications for helmet innovation

  • A. Post University of Ottawa / University College Dublin
  • C. Karton University of Ottawa
  • M. Robidoux University of Ottawa
  • M. D. Gilchrist University College Dublin
  • T. B. Hoshizaki University of Ottawa

Abstract

Ice hockey helmets are currently not designed for youth players, but rather reduced in size to fit smaller heads. As a result they are not as effective for youth protection. In order to target youth specific helmet protection and innovation, there needs to be an understanding of what characteristics contribute to brain trauma in youth ice hockey. The purpose of this research was to compare the frequency and magnitude of head contact events that occur in Novice and Midget ice hockey age categories. 30 Novice and 30 Midget youth boys’ ice hockey games were analyzed to determine the frequency of event type, velocity of contact, and location of contact for head impacts. These events were then reconstructed in laboratory using physical and finite element modelling to determine the maximum principal strain of the events. The results identified that the Novice category helmet design should be focused on reducing impact from hard surfaces, while Midget focused on impacts from collisions with players and the glass.

Published
2019-05-21
How to Cite
[1]
A. Post, C. Karton, M. Robidoux, M. Gilchrist, and T. Hoshizaki, “An examination of the brain trauma in Novice and Midget ice hockey: Implications for helmet innovation”, CMBES, vol. 42, May 2019.
Section
Academic