Adapting Isokinetic Dynamometry for Individuals With Transradial Amputation: a New Tool

  • Jessica Chouinard University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB
  • Victoria Chester University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB
  • Usha Kuruganti University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB

Abstract

Upper limb amputations can have a significant impact on daily functions and affect the quality of life of an individual. There have been significant advances in the materials used to build these devices resulting in lighter and stronger artificial limbs; however, users have indicated that improved function and control strategies are desirable to become more in line with able-bodied limb function. Quantitative clinical assessment has been challenging due to the complexity of the muscle physiology of those with amputations. In addition, most clinical research has focused on studying isometric (stationary) limb movements. In order to develop more robust systems, it is critical to study muscle mechanics of those with amputations under dynamic (moving) movements. One method of safely examining dynamic movements is the use of isokinetic dynamometers. These machines allow measurement of upper and lower extremity isokinetic movements at controlled angular velocities while ensuring no stress is placed on the individual (even if the participant is unable to move the lever arm). For able-bodied participants, this does not present a problem. However, there is currently no commercially available isokinetic dynamometer adapter for prosthesis users. The purpose of this project was to develop an adapter that can be used by those with amputations to safely and effectively operate the dynamometer. The tool that was developed connects to the arm of the dynamometer and is adjustable for different residual limb lengths. The adapter was then used by one clinical patient to determine its effectiveness.
Published
2018-05-08
How to Cite
[1]
J. Chouinard, V. Chester, and U. Kuruganti, “Adapting Isokinetic Dynamometry for Individuals With Transradial Amputation: a New Tool”, CMBES, vol. 41, May 2018.
Section
Academic